9 August 2017 2017 09:15 AM GMT

35% Of German Electricity Consumption Now From Renewables: Grid Challenges Ahead

Electricity generated from the sun, wind and other regenerative sources of energy accounted for 35 percent of Germany’s consumption in the first half of 2017. It was the first time that mark had been reached. The Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research in Baden-Württemberg (ZSW) and the German Association of Energy and Water Industries (BDEW) arrived at this figure in an initial assessment. Renewable energies’ share was thus up two percentage points from the previous year’s period.

Accounting for 39.4 billion kWh (kilowatt hours), onshore wind power was yet again the top source of green electricity (first half of 2016: 34.7 billion kWh, growth: 13.6 percent). Offshore wind power saw the steepest growth, increasing by 47.5 percent to 8.8 billion kWh (first half of 2016: 5.9 billion kWh). The amount of power sourced from biomass increased by 2.2 percent from 22.7 billion kWh to 23.2 billion kWh. Photovoltaic systems generated 21.9 billion kWh of electricity, an increase of 13.5 percent (first half of 2016: 19.3 billion kWh).

“Renewable energies’ increased contribution is gratifying. Unfortunately, the necessary grid expansion is not keeping pace with the growth in regenerative plants because of all the time lost to political debates. Grid expansion and the expansion of renewables have to be far more closely linked and better meshed to reduce the enormous costs of stabilizing networks. On top of that, we will not be able to do without conventional power plants as a backup for secure power supply,” said Stefan Kapferer, Chairman of BDEW’s General Executive Management Board, today in Berlin.

Prof. Frithjof Staiss, Managing Director of the ZSW, adds, “The good news from the electricity sector notwithstanding, the important thing is to continue developing the power supply as a whole in a reliable, affordable and environmentally sound way, and advancing the Energiewende [Germany’s exit from nuclear power and fossil fuels and transition to renewables] on the political and social fronts. And let’s not lose sight of energy efficiency as a core component. The math is simple enough: Energy that is not needed does not need to be generated.”

Hydroelectric power dropped by 18 percent to 9.4 billion kWh (11.5 billion kWh) and municipal solid waste (50 percent biogenic) was up 5 percent to 3.0 billion kWh (2.9 billion kWh), while geothermal energy dropped by 7 percent to 0.078 billion kWh (0.084 billion kWh).

December 13th 2017
EDF Commissions 179 MW At Two Solar Power Plants In Nevada

Policy makers led by US Senator Harry Reid were present at a celebration formally recognising Switch Stations 1 and 2 solar power plants, with a combined generation capacity of 179 MWac, as fully commissioned and in commercial operation. Senator Reid stated “Less than a decade ago, Nevada’s solar energy landscape was nonexistent, but this commissioning helps fulfil the vision I had to make our state the leader in renewable energy development. A technology giant like Switch committing to using 100% renewable energy is truly visionary and grows our clean energy economy by creating hundreds of good-paying construction jobs here.”

December 6th 2017
Renewables Provide 17.8% Of Total US Electricity. Solar Now 2.0% And Wind 6.0%

According to the latest issue of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) “Electric Power Monthly” report, U.S. electrical generation from renewable energy sources (i.e., biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar – inc. distributed solar, wind) rose by 14.69% during the first three-quarters of 2017 compared to the same period in 2016. Simultaneously, electrical generation by fossil fuels and nuclear power combined declined by 5.41%. Nuclear power and coal both dropped by 1.5%, natural gas (including “other” gas) was down by 10.7%, and oil (i.e., petroleum liquids and petroleum coke) plunged by 17.1%.

December 12th 2017
Global Trade In Biofuels Featured At International Renewable Mobility Conference

A significant proportion of global energy use, is in transportation. Action is crucially needed to bring about an energy turnaround in this sector and it’s a topic that has moved higher up the political agenda again since Dieselgate, and with growing calls for a rapid introduction of electromobility. In Germany, the Working Group on Energy Balances (AG Energiebilanzen) has calculated the final energy consumption of 728 TWh by the transport sector in 2016. Data from the German Environment Agency (UBA) reveals that over 90 percent of fuel deployed is derived from mineral oil. World-leading experts meeting in a parallel forum at the 15th International Conference on Renewable Mobility will analyse biofuel trading worldwide, examining various perspectives on requirements, the current state of play and forecasts.

December 8th 2017
Tata Power Solar Commissions India’s First Rooftop Solar Carport In Delhi

Tata Power Solar set another landmark by commissioning an unprecedented rooftop solar project in India – a solar carport on the rooftop of the sprawling 70,000 sq.m Unity One mall, in Rohini, Delhi. The unique rooftop carport is estimated to set off 438 tonnes of carbon emissions annually. The company won the bid in an open tender process fielded by Delhi Metro Rail Corporation for multi-level car parking. The project enables the mall to earn on the unused and excess solar electricity produced. It also cuts down the need to install a second meter or an expensive battery storage system as it is directly connected to the local power grid.

December 8th 2017
By 2036, Clean Energy Can Account for 37% of The Energy Mix For Thailand

With a stronger and more ambitious energy development plan, Thailand’s share of renewable energy in total final energy consumption could surpass its national target by a quarter and reach more than 37 percent by 2036, according to a new report published by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and the Ministry of Energy of Thailand. Renewable Energy Outlook: Thailand finds that decreasing imports of fossil fuels and increasing the share of renewables in the energy mix to 37 percent would improve energy security and reduce the cost of Thailand’s energy system by USD 1.2 billion annually by 2036.


 

   

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