9 August 2017 2017 09:15 AM GMT

35% Of German Electricity Consumption Now From Renewables: Grid Challenges Ahead

Electricity generated from the sun, wind and other regenerative sources of energy accounted for 35 percent of Germany’s consumption in the first half of 2017. It was the first time that mark had been reached. The Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research in Baden-Württemberg (ZSW) and the German Association of Energy and Water Industries (BDEW) arrived at this figure in an initial assessment. Renewable energies’ share was thus up two percentage points from the previous year’s period.

Accounting for 39.4 billion kWh (kilowatt hours), onshore wind power was yet again the top source of green electricity (first half of 2016: 34.7 billion kWh, growth: 13.6 percent). Offshore wind power saw the steepest growth, increasing by 47.5 percent to 8.8 billion kWh (first half of 2016: 5.9 billion kWh). The amount of power sourced from biomass increased by 2.2 percent from 22.7 billion kWh to 23.2 billion kWh. Photovoltaic systems generated 21.9 billion kWh of electricity, an increase of 13.5 percent (first half of 2016: 19.3 billion kWh).

“Renewable energies’ increased contribution is gratifying. Unfortunately, the necessary grid expansion is not keeping pace with the growth in regenerative plants because of all the time lost to political debates. Grid expansion and the expansion of renewables have to be far more closely linked and better meshed to reduce the enormous costs of stabilizing networks. On top of that, we will not be able to do without conventional power plants as a backup for secure power supply,” said Stefan Kapferer, Chairman of BDEW’s General Executive Management Board, today in Berlin.

Prof. Frithjof Staiss, Managing Director of the ZSW, adds, “The good news from the electricity sector notwithstanding, the important thing is to continue developing the power supply as a whole in a reliable, affordable and environmentally sound way, and advancing the Energiewende [Germany’s exit from nuclear power and fossil fuels and transition to renewables] on the political and social fronts. And let’s not lose sight of energy efficiency as a core component. The math is simple enough: Energy that is not needed does not need to be generated.”

Hydroelectric power dropped by 18 percent to 9.4 billion kWh (11.5 billion kWh) and municipal solid waste (50 percent biogenic) was up 5 percent to 3.0 billion kWh (2.9 billion kWh), while geothermal energy dropped by 7 percent to 0.078 billion kWh (0.084 billion kWh).

January 28th 2018
Chinese Solar Surge Fuels Overall Global Growth In Clean Energy Investment

World clean energy investment totalled $333.5 billion last year, up 3% from 2016 and the second highest annual figure ever, taking cumulative investment since 2010 to $2.5 trillion. An extraordinary boom in photovoltaic installations made 2017 a record year for China’s investment in clean energy. This outpaced changes elsewhere, including jumps in investment in Australia and Mexico, and declines in Japan, the U.K. and Germany. The figures up 3% from a revised $324.6 billion in 2016, and only 7% short of the record figure of $360.3 billion, in 2015.

December 6th 2017
Renewables Provide 17.8% Of Total US Electricity. Solar Now 2.0% And Wind 6.0%

According to the latest issue of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) “Electric Power Monthly” report, U.S. electrical generation from renewable energy sources (i.e., biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar – inc. distributed solar, wind) rose by 14.69% during the first three-quarters of 2017 compared to the same period in 2016. Simultaneously, electrical generation by fossil fuels and nuclear power combined declined by 5.41%. Nuclear power and coal both dropped by 1.5%, natural gas (including “other” gas) was down by 10.7%, and oil (i.e., petroleum liquids and petroleum coke) plunged by 17.1%.

January 28th 2018
European Parliament Gives A Resounding Vote In Favour Of Clean Energy In Europe

European lawmakers have called for a renewable energy target of 35% for 2030 – rather than the 27% which the European Commission proposed in 2016. The MEPs have now backed measures substantially raising the European Union’s clean-energy ambitions. By 2030, more than one-third of energy consumed in the EU should be from renewable sources such as wind and solar power. The measures are intended to help cut carbon dioxide emissions. The EU is the world’s third-largest emitter of greenhouse gases after China and the United States, releasing about 10% of global emissions. 

December 27th 2017
Rooftop PV Presents a $23 Billion Opportunity in India Over The Next 5 Years

India is accelerating development of renewable energy projects to provide cheap, reliable and clean power to its 1.3 billion people. The country’s per-capita on-grid electricity consumption has increased significantly over the four years; due to increased industrial activity, higher uptake of electrical appliances by residential electricity users and the addition of new consumers to the grid. During this period, the cost of electricity from rooftop PV has halved, due to fierce competition in the market and a drop in equipment prices. In contrast, average retail electricity rates have increased by 22% in the same period. This has made rooftop PV cheaper than commercial and industrial grid tariffs in all major states in India.

January 8th 2018
Vestas Sets 10.6 GW Record In 2017 After Year-End Surge; Ups Cashflow Guidance

Vestas has received a firm and unconditional order for 190 MW of 4 MW platform turbines in the U.S. taking the global order intake for the company in 2017 to 10.6 GW, surpassing 2016’s record order intake of 10.5 GW. The surge of orders at the end of the year has resulted in the company revising its guidance for free cashflow upwards. It now expects the free cashflow for 2017 to be €1.15bn-€1.25bn, as compared with the previous guidance of €450m-€900m. Markets have reacted favourably with the company share price experiencing an increase of 5%. 


 

   

PS_Wind Energy_Masters_171