12 December 2016 2016 10:02 AM GMT

Biofuels Industry Questions EU Commission’s Revised Renewable Energy Directive

Farmers and Industry leaders including ICSA president Patrick Kent have questioned the European Commission proposals for new legislation on clean energy which has significant implications for crop-based biofuels. Speaking following the publication of the document Mr Kent said, in strong terms: “It beggars belief that these proposals can be described as a clean energy policy when they actually undermine crop-based biofuels.” These proposals refer to the target for the crop biofuel component of EU transport fuels. It demands a reduction from 7% down to 3.8% by 2030.

Continuing Mr Kent said “Up to this point, the Commission has been supportive of biofuels yet they have now decided to reverse their policy without any scientific basis for so doing. Crop-based biofuels are good for farmers, good for the environment and good for Europe. This move today from the Commission simply defies logic and ICSA will be pressing for its immediate reconsideration.”

The EC views this introduction of a cap on the contribution of food-based biofuels; towards the EU renewable energy target, starting at 7% in 2021 and going down progressively to 3.8% in 2030; as a mechanism to minimise the Indirect Land-Use Change (ILUC) impacts.

It is also proposing to introduce a new sustainability criterion on forest biomass. It proposes an obligation on European transport fuel suppliers to provide an increasing share of renewable and low-carbon fuels, including advanced biofuels, renewable transport fuels of non-biological origin for example hydrogen, waste-based fuels and renewable electricity.

In energy terms, the level of this obligation will progressively increase from 1.5% in 2021 to 6.8 % in 2030, including at least 3.6% of advanced biofuels. Preferential rules apply to advanced aviation fuels in order to support their deployment in the aviation sector, the EC has said in a statement. It also plans to introduce national databases to ensure traceability of the fuels and mitigate the risk of fraud.

Forthcoming Events: 23rd-24th January 2017, 14th international Conference on Renewable Mobility Fuels of the Future

December 12th 2017
Global Trade In Biofuels Featured At International Renewable Mobility Conference

A significant proportion of global energy use, is in transportation. Action is crucially needed to bring about an energy turnaround in this sector and it’s a topic that has moved higher up the political agenda again since Dieselgate, and with growing calls for a rapid introduction of electromobility. In Germany, the Working Group on Energy Balances (AG Energiebilanzen) has calculated the final energy consumption of 728 TWh by the transport sector in 2016. Data from the German Environment Agency (UBA) reveals that over 90 percent of fuel deployed is derived from mineral oil. World-leading experts meeting in a parallel forum at the 15th International Conference on Renewable Mobility will analyse biofuel trading worldwide, examining various perspectives on requirements, the current state of play and forecasts.

December 10th 2017
EU Parliament Aims Higher For Renewables In Its 2030 Climate And Energy Goals

The European Parliament’s Industry & Energy (ITRE) and Environment (ENVI) committees have voted their position on the Energy Union Governance Regulation, just a week after the ITRE committee called for raising the EU’s 2030 renewable energy target to 35% instead of 27%. The Governance Regulation sets out how EU Member States will deliver the EU’s 2030 Climate and Energy goals including the binding EU renewables target and how they will give visibility to renewable energy investors on post-2020 deployment volumes. The IEA now says that wind will be Europe’s leading electricity source soon after 2030.

December 12th 2017
Renewable Future Challenges UK And Germany To Build Flexibility In Power Systems

A new economic study highlights that future energy systems in the UK and Germany, with very high levels of variable renewable generation, must be complemented by flexible resources, including energy storage. The study was released by Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF). “This study highlights a seismic shift in how power systems will operate in the future. As wind and solar become the cheapest options for power generation, the race is on to develop and deploy the flexible resources that will complement them,” said Albert Cheung, head of global analysis at Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

November 30th 2017
Vestas Boosts Presence In Spain. Seals Agreement To Build 5 New Wind Parks

At WindEurope 2017 in Amsterdam, Vestas and Gas Natural Fenosa has sealed an agreement to build 86 MW of wind energy across five new wind parks in Spain. The wind parks will be Vestas’ first projects derived from Spain’s latest auctions held in May. Commissioning and installation of the wind turbines is expected for the second half of 2018. The renewables branch of Gas Natural Fenosa, one of the leading utilities worldwide, has installed more than 400 MW of Vestas’ turbines in Spain, the latest installed in 2016.

December 8th 2017
By 2036, Clean Energy Can Account for 37% of The Energy Mix For Thailand

With a stronger and more ambitious energy development plan, Thailand’s share of renewable energy in total final energy consumption could surpass its national target by a quarter and reach more than 37 percent by 2036, according to a new report published by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and the Ministry of Energy of Thailand. Renewable Energy Outlook: Thailand finds that decreasing imports of fossil fuels and increasing the share of renewables in the energy mix to 37 percent would improve energy security and reduce the cost of Thailand’s energy system by USD 1.2 billion annually by 2036.


 

   

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