ees 2019
22 September 2018 2018 09:57 AM GMT

EU Supports Denmark’s Drive Towards 50% Energy Sourcing From Renewables By 2030

The European Commission has approved under EU State aid rules three schemes to support electricity production from wind and solar in Denmark in 2018 and 2019. Denmark has a goal of supplying 50% of its energy consumption from renewable energy sources by 2030 and to become independent from fossil fuels by 2050. In line with this goal, the Danish authorities will implement three measures supporting renewable energy:

  • multi-technology tender scheme for onshore and offshore wind turbines and solar installations, with a budget of DKK 842 million (€112 million). The beneficiaries of the aid will be selected through two tenders organised in 2018 and 2019, with the different technologies competing with each other. The selected installations will offer their electricity on the market and receive support in the form of a premium on top of the market price (top-up payment).
  • An aid scheme for onshore wind for test and demonstration projects outside the two national test centres for large wind turbines, with an expected budget of DKK 200 million (€27 million), and a transitional aid scheme for onshore wind, with a budget of DKK 40 million (€5 million).

The aid for the three schemes will be granted for a period of 20 years from the time of the connection to the grid. The renewable support schemes are financed from the State budget.

The Commission assessed all three schemes under EU State aid rules, in particular, the Commission’s 2014 Guidelines on State Aid for Environmental Protection and Energy. It found that the three Danish schemes will encourage the development of offshore and onshore wind and solar technologies, in line with the requirements of the Guidelines.

On this basis, the Commission concluded that the measures will help Denmark boost the share of electricity produced from renewable energy sources, in line with the environmental objectives of the EU, while any distortion of competition caused by the state support is minimised.

The Commission’s 2014 Guidelines on State Aid for Environmental Protection and Energy allow Member States to support the production of electricity from renewable energy sources, subject to certain conditions. These rules are aimed at meeting the EU’s ambitious energy and climate targets at the least possible cost for taxpayers and without undue distortions of competition in the Single Market.

The Renewable Energy Directive established targets for all Member States’ shares of renewable energy sources in gross final energy consumption by 2020. For Denmark, that target is 30% by 2020. Furthermore, Denmark has a goal of supplying 50% of its energy consumption from renewable energy sources by 2030 and to become independent from fossil fuels by 2050. All three schemes aim to contribute to reaching those targets.

More information on the decision will be available, once potential confidentiality issues have been resolved, in the State aid register on the Commission’s competition website under the case numbers SA.49918, SA.50715 and SA.50717. The State Aid Weekly e-News lists new publications of State aid decisions on the internet and in the EU Official Journal.

November 9th 2018
US: EIA Data Shows Renewables Outpacing Nuclear Power In Electrical Generation

The latest data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is showing that electrical generation by renewable sources has edged past nuclear power. Additionally, wind and solar now provide 10% of the nation’s electricity, overall; with solar alone surpassing biomass and geothermal combined. Significantly, solar now triples electrical generation by oil. In addition, the data reveals that solar and wind both showed strong growth with solar (i.e., utility-scale + distributed PV) expanding by 27.6% and wind by 11.2%. Combined, they accounted for nearly a tenth of the nation’s electrical generation.

November 8th 2018
Macquarie Capital Reach Financial Closure On Largest PPP Project In Netherlands

Ahead of speaking at the 17th annual Benelux Infrastructure Forum next month in Amsterdam, Macquarie Capital, Ballast Nedam, and DEME have recently announced that they’ve reached financial closure on the largest PPP project ever awarded in the Netherlands. The €1 billion Blankenburg Connection PPP project, which involves the construction of an immersed tunnel under the Rotterdam port waterway, a land tunnel and two junctions, aims to improve road links between Rotterdam and its port. This further establishes the Benelux PPP market as one of the most active and important regions for global infrastructure projects business.

November 2nd 2018
Ingeteam’s Indian Wind Converter Factory Achieves DNV GL Certification First

Ingeteam has announced that it received DNV GL’s “Shop Approval in Renewable Energy” certification for the wind converter manufacturing facility recently established by the company in the Tamil Nadu region. Its new facility is the first-ever wind converter factory to receive such a certification in India. DNV GL’s Shop Approval is awarded upon successful completion of a comprehensive audit and enables Ingeteam to simplify the scope of subsequent quality inspections. This next level certification guarantees that a workshop operates within a high-standard manufacturing environment and that adequate working procedures and methods are consistently deployed by qualified staff.

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