5 January 2018 2018 03:24 PM GMT

Hype Or The Future? Sectoral Coupling With Electricity-Based Fuels

Electricity-based fuels are at an early stage and deploying electricity from renewable energies to produce fuels such as hydrogen, synthetic liquid fuels or methane is crucial to avoid greenhouse gas emissions. There are significant reasons to boost this new and potentially massive sector. The German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) is making around 130 million Euro available for creating incentives to utilise synergies for linking energy, transport and maritime industries.

Numerous parallel forums at the 15th International Conference on Renewable Mobility will address various technical and economic topics concerning power trains of the future. Electricity-based fuels as a means of linking the electricity and transport sectors (sectoral coupling) will be the focus of attention at a parallel forum with experts from various companies and research institutes at 9 a.m. on day two of the conference, 23rd January 2018.

At the start of 2017, the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) launched the “Energy Transition in the Transport Sector: Sector Coupling Through Electricity-based Fuels” funding initiative. The ministry is making around 130 million Euro available for the next three years, thus creating incentives to utilise synergies through research on linking energy, transport and maritime industries. The funding targets projects on production and use of alternative, electricity-based fuels and considers how to integrate new technologies into the energy industry. The goal is to foster use of electricity-based fuels in cars, trucks, ships, construction machinery and stationary industrial engines. At the same time, energy, automotive and component companies invest considerable sums in these prospects, which will contribute to shaping the combustion engine’s future.

Electricity-based fuels are just at the project stage. Commercialisation and market launch will however only have an impact on climate protection in the long term. Deploying electricity from renewable energies to produce fuels such as hydrogen, synthetic liquid fuels or methane is crucial to avoid greenhouse gas emissions. Presentations in the parallel forum “Electricity-based Fuels – Connecting the Electricity and Transport Sector” will address current research progress and the development context shaping future use:

Dr. Alexander Tremel (Siemens AG) views electricity-based fuels as a significant link between the electricity industry and the transport sector, as well as an important factor for successful sector coupling.

Sebastian Becker (sunfire AG) describes current progress and future steps in transforming power-to-liquids. Reversible high-temperature electrolysis (RSOC) allows transposition of this technology from the electricity sector to the fuel sector. Combining fuel-cell technology and electrolysis in one facility, it produces green hydrogen using electricity generated from wind or solar energy.

Stephan Schmidt (Chemieanlagenbau Chemnitz GmbH) highlights technological scope to produce synthetic petrol.

Horst Fehrenbach (ifeu Institut für Energie-und Umweltforschung Heidelberg) analyses the climate balance of various powertrain systems. He will focus on fossil fuels, biofuels, power-to-X and battery-powered vehicles.

Karin Naumann (DBFZ Deutsches Biomasseforschungszentrum gGmbH) compares several types of renewable fuels in her presentation. A fundamental system comparison of biomass-to-X and power-to-X takes centre-stage in this appraisal. Further information on the entire programme and registration is available at the event website.

February 5th 2018
European Parliament Gives A Resounding Vote In Favour Of Clean Energy In Europe

European lawmakers have called for a renewable energy target of 35% for 2030 – rather than the 27% which the European Commission proposed in 2016. The MEPs have now backed measures substantially raising the European Union’s clean-energy ambitions. By 2030, more than one-third of energy consumed in the EU should be from renewable sources such as wind and solar power. The measures are intended to help cut carbon dioxide emissions. The EU is the world’s third-largest emitter of greenhouse gases after China and the United States, releasing about 10% of global emissions. 

February 5th 2018
Masdar City To Test Latest Concepts In Autonomous Electric Vehicles

ICONIQ Motors, a China-based EV company, has reached agreement to test its autonomous driving concept at Masdar City. The ICONIQ SEVEN, one of the world’s latest EV models is a futuristic vehicle, built on an intelligent, connected vehicle platform integrated with Microsoft’s AZURE cloud technology; and is set to hit the market in 2019. “Masdar City has put smart and sustainable mobility at the centre of its strategy, as highlighted by the historic success of its flagship driverless Personal Rapid Transit (PRT) system,” said Yousef Baselaib, Executive Director of Sustainable Real Estate at Madsar. “It is the ideal location to test innovative autonomous driving concepts.”

January 10th 2018
US: Doubling Of Wind & Solar Capacity Possible By 2020 as Coal & Nuclear Drop

In the latest issue of its “Energy Infrastructure Update” (with data through November 30, 2017), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) notes that proposed net additions to generating capacity by utility-scale wind and solar could total 115,984 megawatts (MW) by December 2020 – effectively doubling their current installed capacity of 115,520 MW.  The numbers were released as FERC prepares for a January 10 meeting to consider U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s proposal for a bailout of the coal and nuclear industries.


 

   

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