2 July 2018 2018 04:45 PM GMT

Industry, Policy Makers Explore South Eastern Europe’s Vast Renewable Potential

WindEurope and Eurelectric held a joint workshop in Sofia recently looking at how to unlock the vast potential of wind energy in South East EuropeThe event gathered policy makers and industry to discuss how to restart local markets in view of the Clean Energy Package, with a focus on Bulgaria, Greece and Romania. An enormous 500 GW of wind energy is available in South East Europe, a potential which is currently not being realised. Following the event, WindEurope and Eurelectric issued a series of recommendations to help unlock this potential.

WindEurope CEO Giles Dickson then presented these at the Central and South Eastern Europe Connectivity (CESEC) ministerial meeting in Sofia. The CESEC group gathers governments from South East Europe to discuss energy issues.

The recommendations are four-fold. First, though onshore wind is the cheapest form of new power generation in Europe today, wind energy projects are capital intensive and sensitive to regulatory uncertainty. “A series of abrupt and/or retroactive changes to national support schemes in the region since 2013 has resulted in additional risk premiums on projects. It’s as high as 12% in Croatia compared to 3.5%-4.5% in North West Europe. This means governments and consumers in the region pay a higher price for the same installations,” said Dickson.

Second, to help bring down the cost of projects in the region, WindEurope also urged governments to submit their 2030 National Energy and Climate Plans well before the end of 2019 and with an appropriate level of detail. The plans should cover the integration of regional energy markets, development of joint renewable energy projects as well as long-term decarbonisation and electrification strategies. “Investments, economies of scale and cost reductions materialise where the industry is assured of stable policy and regulation going forward,” said Dickson.

Third, European industry and consumers are already benefitting from corporate renewable power purchase agreements (PPAs). They allow large energy consumers – e.g. in IT, chemicals and heavy industry – to secure wind power at a competitive price. In 2017, almost 1.1 GW of renewables was contracted with corporate buyers, but deals are currently concentrated in Northern Europe. “In order to help countries achieve their national renewable energy ambitions and unlock billions of euros of investment, we call on CESEC governments to remove the regulatory and administrative barriers to corporate PPAs,” Dickson added.

Finally, for consumers to take full advantage of wind energy, electricity markets and grids need to be transformed and made fit for wind and other renewables. “We’d like to see CESEC develop a list of priority renewable energy projects to compete for EU funding under the Connecting Europe Facility. CESEC’s list of priority projects and actions should also include efforts to identify and support cross-border renewable energy projects,” said Dickson.

October 12th 2018
EES & IBESA Summit France 2018: Storage Industry Setting A Course For The Future

The ees & IBESA Summit in Strasbourg is the main meeting point for the battery and energy storage industry in France. On October 24, 2018, European manufacturers, service providers, project developers, systems integrators and research institutes will come together in Alsace to make transnational contacts. Supported by ees Europe, the continent’s largest and most visited exhibition for batteries and energy storage systems, and the International Battery and Energy Storage Alliance (IBESA), summit participants will discuss the latest topics and trends, and develop new business models and visions for the new energy future.

September 29th 2018
IRENA: Innovation Front and Centre, As Leaders Shape the Future Energy System

Participants from more than 80 countries explored the disruptive innovations in digitalisation and decentralisation that are transforming energy systems around the world. Remarkable cost reductions driven by technological innovation and an increasingly conducive policy environment have made renewable energy increasingly competitive with conventional fuels in many parts of the world. In parallel, innovations such as the Internet of Things, blockchain, artificial intelligence, smart charging of electric vehicles, and hydrogen power and storage are making energy systems increasingly integrated and flexible and are supporting the transition to a renewable-powered future.

September 26th 2018
UK Wind Generation Capacity Smashes Through 20 Gigawatt Mark

RenewableUK has announced that the UK has hit a historic milestone of 20GW (20,000MW) of wind generation capacity. The opening of Ørsted’s 659MW Walney Extension off the coast of Cumbria this month pushed the total over the 20GW mark. Commenting on the announcement, RenewableUK’s Executive Director Emma Pinchbeck said: “It took 19 years to install the first 5GW of wind energy in the UK and we’ve now installed the same amount in under two years. That phenomenal growth shows just how quickly the UK is moving to a smart, low carbon power system and wind energy is at the heart of that.  

September 22nd 2018
MHI Vestas Signs Firm Order for Largest MW Project in Company History

MHI Vestas Offshore Wind will supply 90 of its flagship V164-9.5 MW turbines for the 860 MW Triton Knoll Offshore Wind Farm project; its largest MW project to date. MHI Vestas celebrated the financial close of the deal with innogy, at the site, confirming the project as the largest (MW) in the history of the turbine company. Affirming its strengthening position in the UK offshore wind market, the Danish-Japanese joint venture will supply 90 of the world’s most powerful commercially available turbine, the V164-9.5 MW, and has agreed on a comprehensive 5-year O&M agreement.

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