11 April 2017 2017 08:30 AM GMT

Morocco Rises: Starts Construction On The World’s Largest Solar Power Complex

In the presence of the Moroccan King, Mohammed VI, the first sod was cut in Ouarzazate for the construction of a fourth power plant – NOORo IV – inside the world’s largest solar power complex. KfW Development Bank had signed the loan agreement for EUR 60 million for the construction of NOORo IV back in November 2016 in the presence of the Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development, Gerd Müller, at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Marrakech. After commissioning, which will likely take place in the beginning of 2018, the photovoltaic plant will enable annual savings of at least 56,000 tonnes in CO2 emissions. When all four power plants are combined, CO2 emissions will be reduced by around 800,000 tonnes every year. The Noor complex is scheduled to be completed by 2019 and supply a total of 580 megawatts of output power from three solar thermal energy plants and one photovoltaic plant.

“This makes Morocco a pioneer in Africa when it comes to transitioning to renewable sources of energy. Morocco is an example of how economic growth and development can be combined with climate protection”, said Dr Norbert Kloppenburg, Member of the Executive Board of KfW Group.

Since 2009, Morocco has been working to implement its ambitious energy targets: by 2030, the percentage of installed electricity generation capacity based on renewable energies is planned to reach 52 per cent. In addition to solar energy, the country is also focusing on wind and water power. Moreover, Morocco also heavily participates in international endeavours to protect the climate, including those that take place in the context of the international Climate Partnership for implementing national climate contributions over which Morocco presides together with Germany.

KfW is supporting the construction of the solar power complex in southern Morocco with a total of EUR 829 million, on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) and the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB). The planned total costs are approximately EUR 2.2 billion. At the start of 2016, the first power plant, NOORo I, was commissioned for the solar energy complex; NOORo II and III are still under construction. Germany plays a significant role in the project, which Morocco is using to implement its energy transition. In addition, the European Union and the French development agency, AfD, together with the European Investment Bank (EIB) have pledged financing.

October 16th 2017
Uganda Inaugurates Breakthrough Tororo PV Plant. A Future Model For Africa?

Production has commenced at the Tororo PV power plant; which, with 16 GWh of renewable energy generated annually, will cater for the energy requirements of 35,838 people and help reduce CO2 emissions by 7,200 tons. Overall, $19.6 million was invested to build the 10 MWp plant, with the engagement of several major organisations including KfW and FMO Development Banks, the World Bank and the EU. Attilio Pacifici, EU Ambassador said, “One of the key objectives of this plan is to encourage private sector participation in higher risk investments and we’re happy to demonstrate that Uganda is well positioned to be successful and a good model for replication.”

October 10th 2017
EDF Completes Blythe Installation Of Potent New Turbines, Powering 34,000 Homes

The Blyth Offshore Demonstrator project will produce enough low-carbon electricity to power approximately 34,000 UK households, using 8.0MW wind turbines with a power mode uprating them to 8.3MW. It will save around 57,600 tonnes of CO2 emissions each year and is the first offshore wind project to connect using 66kv rated cables. It’s also the first time that a “float and submerge” gravity-based foundation (GBF) has been used for offshore wind turbines. Each GBF is made up of more than 1,800m3 of concrete and weighs over 15,000 tonnes when fully installed on the seabed, and the structures have a total height of around 60 metres from the base to the access platform.

October 10th 2017
Enel Starts Construction Of Australia’s Largest Solar PV Project

The Bungala Solar One facility is part of the Bungala Solar PV Project and will have an installed capacity of 137.7 MW out of a total of more than 275 MW for the whole project, that will be able to produce 570 GWh per year. The facility will cover an area of approximately 300 hectares and will consist of about 420,000 polycrystalline PV modules mounted on single-axis tracker structures which will follow the Sun’s path from east to west; increasing the amount of energy produced by the plant, compared to PV modules with fixed structures. The overall Bungala Solar PV project is expected to become fully operational in early 2019.


 

   

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