21 May 2017 2017 09:15 AM GMT

Russia: Abundance Of Renewables Can Fuel Growth; Quadruple Clean Energy By 2030

Russia can increase the share of renewables in its energy mix from roughly 3 percent today to more than 11 percent by 2030, according to new findings by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The growth in renewable energy use would represent nearly a fourfold increase in the share of renewables between 2014 and 2030. Renewable Energy Prospects for the Russian Federation was presented to high-level stakeholders at a meeting in Moscow, between the Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation and IRENA.

“The global energy transition is underway, with this study we have a better understanding of Russia’s renewable energy potential, what benefits it could bring, and what can be done to make this a reality,” said IRENA Director-General Adnan Z. Amin. “Russia has had a long history of leadership in the energy sector – and now has the opportunity to extend that leadership into renewable energy.”

Russia has significant potential of all renewable energy sources, with large hydropower and bioenergy being the main sources of renewables in the country’s energy system today. By the end of 2015, total installed renewable power generation capacity reached 53.5 gigawatts (GW), representing about 20 percent of the country’s total capacity, the majority of which lies in large hydropower.

“Further developing Russia’s rich and diverse renewable energy resources can significantly contribute to the country’s economic objectives such as economic growth and employment, diversify the energy mix, improve energy security and reduce energy supply costs in remote regions,” Mr Amin added.

Under Russia’s current energy strategy the share of renewable energy will reach 4.9 percent by 2030, falling short of its potential of more than 11.3 percent, by IRENA’s estimates. According to the new working paper, the power sector is estimated to have the highest renewable energy share, at about 30 percent in 2030 — split into 20 percent for hydropower and 10 percent for wind, solar photovoltaic (PV) and geothermal power.

In addition to hydropower and bioenergy, Russia has already taken steps to accelerate deployment of other renewable energy technologies. The country’s current renewable energy policy focuses on accelerating the deployment of wind and solar PV, and in 2016, approximately 70 megawatts of new renewable energy capacity was introduced.

To implement the study’s recommendations, an annual investment of approximately USD 15 billion per year between 2015 and 2050 is required, but IRENA shows that the benefits can exceed costs when externalities related to human health and climate change are considered. Renewables identified under REmap can save up to USD 8 billion per year by 2030, and additional benefits could include potentially exporting wind and hydropower to Asia, and biofuels to Europe — according to current estimates Russia has the largest wind potential in the world.

Renewable Energy Prospects for the Russian Federation is part of IRENA’s renewable energy roadmap programme, REmap, which determines the potential for countries, regions and the world to scale up renewables to ensure an affordable and sustainable energy future. The roadmap focuses not just on renewable power technologies, but also technology options in heating, cooling and transport. The Russian Federation study is the latest in the series of country-level REmap analyses, which includes countries such as China, Germany, Indonesia, Mexico and the United States.

The full report can be downloaded here.

IRENA is mandated to be the global hub for renewable energy cooperation and information exchange by 150 Members (149 States and the European Union). 27 additional countries are in the accession process and actively engaged. IRENA promotes the widespread adoption and sustainable use of all forms of renewable energy, in the pursuit of sustainable development, energy access, energy security and low-carbon economic growth and prosperity.

May 20th 2018
European Parliament Gives A Resounding Vote In Favour Of Clean Energy In Europe

European lawmakers have called for a renewable energy target of 35% for 2030 – rather than the 27% which the European Commission proposed in 2016. The MEPs have now backed measures substantially raising the European Union’s clean-energy ambitions. By 2030, more than one-third of energy consumed in the EU should be from renewable sources such as wind and solar power. The measures are intended to help cut carbon dioxide emissions. The EU is the world’s third-largest emitter of greenhouse gases after China and the United States, releasing about 10% of global emissions. 

June 20th 2018
Battery Boom: Wind And Solar Can Generate Half Of Worldwide Electricity By 2050

Coal is to shrink to just 11% of global electricity generation by mid-century, from 38% now, as costs shift heavily in favour of wind, solar and batteries. Wind and solar are set to surge to almost “50 by 50” – 50% of world generation by 2050 due to reductions in cost. “Cheap battery storage means that it becomes increasingly possible to finesse the delivery of electricity from wind and solar so that these technologies can help meet demand even when the wind isn’t blowing and the sun isn’t shining. The result will be renewables eating up more and more of the existing market for coal, gas and nuclear.”

June 22nd 2018
Growth Of Renewables In Peru As Enel Opens Largest Wind Farm In Country

Enel is now Peru’s leading renewable energy generator with around 1.1 GW of installed capacity following the commissioning of Wayra I which, with more than 132 MW, is now Peru’s largest wind farm. Built in approximately a year and comprising 42 wind turbines of 3 MW over each, it’s expected to produce 600 GWh per year; enough to avoid the annual emission of over 285,000 tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere. The energy generated by the wind farm is being delivered to the Peruvian transmission grid (SEIN) through the Poroma substation. The project is supported by a 20-year energy supply contract with Peru’s Ministry of Energy and Mines.

December 6th 2017
Renewables Provide 17.8% Of Total US Electricity. Solar Now 2.0% And Wind 6.0%

According to the latest issue of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) “Electric Power Monthly” report, U.S. electrical generation from renewable energy sources (i.e., biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar – inc. distributed solar, wind) rose by 14.69% during the first three-quarters of 2017 compared to the same period in 2016. Simultaneously, electrical generation by fossil fuels and nuclear power combined declined by 5.41%. Nuclear power and coal both dropped by 1.5%, natural gas (including “other” gas) was down by 10.7%, and oil (i.e., petroleum liquids and petroleum coke) plunged by 17.1%.

June 14th 2018
Major Wins For Solar As EU Increases Renewable Energy Target

The European Parliament, European Council and European Commission have agreed to a binding 32% EU renewable energy target for 2030, up from the original proposal of 27%. James Watson, CEO SolarPower Europe commented ‘The deal is a good one for solar. We see a much more ambitious target than was expected just a few months ago and importantly we have a strong framework for self-consumption and prosumers. Households wake up this morning with the knowledge that they will have a new right – the right to self-generate, consume and store the energy they produce. This is a major achievement.