2 April 2016 2016 05:01 PM GMT

Strong Growth For Solar PV In Turkey Expected In 2016 and 2017

Analysts and industry representatives are expecting strong growth in photovoltaics (PV) in Turkey. “The market has the potential this year to reach the 500 MW expansion mark,” says Josefin Berg, an analyst at consulting firm IHS. In 2016 and 2017, an increased number of large-scale projects with more than one MW capacity are expected to receive approval and will then be carried out. The first installment for the licensed large-scale plants is 600 MW.

First Solar for example, has secured interconnection rights for three planned PV plants in southern Turkey. The projects with a combined capacity of 19 MW will be developed in the Muğla, Burdur, and Urfa provinces. When complete, the plants will produce an estimated 31.5 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year, sufficient to power an estimated 14,000 average homes in the country “First Solar sees a tremendous amount of potential in Turkey,” Evren Evcit, First Solar’s Head of Business Development for Turkey says.

German based mounting systems specialist Schletter also expressed optimism. Currently, the company is manufacturing for local EPC’s and investors, for example, two tracker projects, one with a size of 11.5 MW in Kayseri, Anatolia, and a 5-MW project in Isparta. “In addition, we are currently building and delivering permanently elevated open-area installations with about 20 MW in Mersin, Isparta and other regions,”  Taner Öztürk of Schletter Solar Montaj Sistemleri Türkiyesays. He is expecting the expansion of the Solar PV market in Turkey to level off at approximately 1 GW annually. The demand for roof-mounted systems is also set to increase in 2016.

IBC Solar expressed similar optimism. “The installed Solar PV capacity being targeted in 2016 is between 800 and 900 MW, and we are looking to achieve a market share of ten per cent of that. We currently have good chances of achieving this goal,” said Bulent Yildiz, managing director of IBC Solar Türkiye. The taxation of imported modules, which came into effect in Turkey in December, does not affect the project business in most cases. The investors can apply for a VAT exemption for import modules as well. The projects that are affected are smaller ones, for which an application for VAT would have been too much work. The Turkish government is clearly pursuing the goal of encouraging the use of locally-produced modules in this segment. The current total capacity of Turkish module manufacturers is approximately 300 MW.

Can Sözen, head of the Turkish system provider Zenit Enerji in Izmir is expecting PV business of up to 100 MW in 2016. “We see also more and more engagement from local municipalities and universities for solar electricity”, Sözen says. For example Inönü University Turgut Özal Medical Center operates a 5,3 MW solar PV power plant since last year, the biggest PV-plant so far at a Turkish university. The project just was awarded the prestigious ICCI Energy Award in the solar power category.

ICCI 2016, 22nd International Energy and Environment Fair and Conference, will take place from 27 to 29 April at Expo Center in Istanbul and is considered to be the most important energy event in Turkey and the region. More than 340 exhibitors and 16,000 visitors are expected. By hosting a special forum for solar energy at the ICCI, we intend to provide a platform for investors and the industry to promote the development of photovoltaic potential in Turkey”, says Murat Özer, deputy general director of Hannover Fairs Turkey.

January 10th 2018
US: Doubling Of Wind & Solar Capacity Possible By 2020 as Coal & Nuclear Drop

In the latest issue of its “Energy Infrastructure Update” (with data through November 30, 2017), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) notes that proposed net additions to generating capacity by utility-scale wind and solar could total 115,984 megawatts (MW) by December 2020 – effectively doubling their current installed capacity of 115,520 MW.  The numbers were released as FERC prepares for a January 10 meeting to consider U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s proposal for a bailout of the coal and nuclear industries.

January 22nd 2018
EV, Renewables See CO2 Emissions Plateau By 2030, But Far From 2 Degree Pathway

Major shifts in the global energy landscape, particularly related to electric vehicles (EVs) and renewable energy sources, mean that MEI expects global CO₂emissions to plateau by 2030. However, increased global energy demand means emissions will remain at more than double the level required for a 2 degrees Celsius warming pathway. Ole Rolser, Associate Partner and Solution Leader at MEI, comments: “Despite the significant momentum around EVs and renewable energy sources taking an increasing share of the power market, to realise the 2 degrees pathway scenario, we’d have to see much broader, much more disruptive change than what we’re seeing now.”

January 22nd 2018
European Parliament Gives A Resounding Vote In Favour Of Clean Energy In Europe

European lawmakers have called for a renewable energy target of 35% for 2030 – rather than the 27% which the European Commission proposed in 2016. The MEPs have now backed measures substantially raising the European Union’s clean-energy ambitions. By 2030, more than one-third of energy consumed in the EU should be from renewable sources such as wind and solar power. The measures are intended to help cut carbon dioxide emissions. The EU is the world’s third-largest emitter of greenhouse gases after China and the United States, releasing about 10% of global emissions. 

January 19th 2018
Chinese Solar Surge Fuels Overall Global Growth In Clean Energy Investment

World clean energy investment totalled $333.5 billion last year, up 3% from 2016 and the second highest annual figure ever, taking cumulative investment since 2010 to $2.5 trillion. An extraordinary boom in photovoltaic installations made 2017 a record year for China’s investment in clean energy. This outpaced changes elsewhere, including jumps in investment in Australia and Mexico, and declines in Japan, the U.K. and Germany. The figures up 3% from a revised $324.6 billion in 2016, and only 7% short of the record figure of $360.3 billion, in 2015.


 

   

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