9 December 2015 2015 01:30 AM GMT

Toshiba Eyes Collaboration in Tanzania’s Geothermal Sector

Toshiba Corp. has signed an agreement with Tanzania Geothermal Development Co. to explore opportunities to collaborate in geothermal power development in Tanzania.

TGDC, a subsidiary of Tanzania Electric Supply oy, is the sole organization with geothermal exploitation rights in Tanzania, and its business scope ranges from the development of geothermal resources to the construction of power plants. Toshiba said it aims to contribute to geothermal power generation in Tanzania, including the development and provision of major equipment, creation of guidelines for plant operation and management, and personnel training.

Tanzania has the third largest geothermal resources in Africa, following Kenya and Ethiopia, with over 5,000 megawatts of capacity. At present, however, approximately 60% of Tanzania’s electricity supply relies on hydro and fossils fuels.

June 23rd 2017
Wind Power Can Provide Energy On Coldest Days: Met Office, Imperial College

A new study by climate scientists has advanced the understanding of the potential for wind power to provide energy during the coldest spells of winter weather. The team, which involved scientists from the Met Office Hadley Centre, Imperial College London and the University of Reading, compared wind power availability with electricity demand in winter and they found an interesting result. The team found that during the highest 5% of energy demand days, one-third produce more wind power than the winter average. “The very coldest days are associated with a mix of different weather patterns, some of which produce high winds in parts of the UK.

May 21st 2017
US Wind And Solar Surge: Providing Majority of New Generating Capacity Q1 2017

According to the latest issue of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) “Energy Infrastructure Update” (with data through March 31, 2017), wind and solar provided 50.84% of the new electrical generating capacity added to the U.S. grid during the first quarter of 2017. Significantly, renewables power sources are now almost 20% of the total US electrical generating capacity. If current growth rates continue, renewables should top 20% before the end of this year. Generating capacity from renewable sources is now more than double that of nuclear power (9.10%) and rapidly approaching that of coal (24.25%).