9 December 2015 2015 01:30 AM GMT

Toshiba Eyes Collaboration in Tanzania’s Geothermal Sector

Toshiba Corp. has signed an agreement with Tanzania Geothermal Development Co. to explore opportunities to collaborate in geothermal power development in Tanzania.

TGDC, a subsidiary of Tanzania Electric Supply oy, is the sole organization with geothermal exploitation rights in Tanzania, and its business scope ranges from the development of geothermal resources to the construction of power plants. Toshiba said it aims to contribute to geothermal power generation in Tanzania, including the development and provision of major equipment, creation of guidelines for plant operation and management, and personnel training.

Tanzania has the third largest geothermal resources in Africa, following Kenya and Ethiopia, with over 5,000 megawatts of capacity. At present, however, approximately 60% of Tanzania’s electricity supply relies on hydro and fossils fuels.

June 20th 2018
Battery Boom: Wind And Solar Can Generate Half Of Worldwide Electricity By 2050

Coal is to shrink to just 11% of global electricity generation by mid-century, from 38% now, as costs shift heavily in favour of wind, solar and batteries. Wind and solar are set to surge to almost “50 by 50” – 50% of world generation by 2050 due to reductions in cost. “Cheap battery storage means that it becomes increasingly possible to finesse the delivery of electricity from wind and solar so that these technologies can help meet demand even when the wind isn’t blowing and the sun isn’t shining. The result will be renewables eating up more and more of the existing market for coal, gas and nuclear.”

January 10th 2018
US: Doubling Of Wind & Solar Capacity Possible By 2020 as Coal & Nuclear Drop

In the latest issue of its “Energy Infrastructure Update” (with data through November 30, 2017), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) notes that proposed net additions to generating capacity by utility-scale wind and solar could total 115,984 megawatts (MW) by December 2020 – effectively doubling their current installed capacity of 115,520 MW.  The numbers were released as FERC prepares for a January 10 meeting to consider U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s proposal for a bailout of the coal and nuclear industries.