10 November 2015 2015 01:37 AM GMT

U.S. Geothermal Inc. Signs Deal to Buy Geothermal Equipment

U.S. Geothermal Inc. has signed an agreement to acquire all of the major and long lead equipment for the construction of three binary geothermal power plants at what it called “a significant discount.”

The equipment was part of an order for six power plant units by another geothermal developer, but only three were installed. The components for the three units being purchased are all new and unused, and have been held in storage. Upon closing of the transaction, they will be moved to a company owned site.

The equipment is from the same manufacturers, and is of a similar size and design, to that installed at the company’s Neal Hot Springs and San Emidio power plants. The design output of the acquired units totals approximately 35 megawatts. Actual output of each unit will be determined by resource conditions found at the sites at which the equipment is ultimately installed.

The three equipment packages which represent approximately 70% of the components needed for the complete plants, will meet the major and long lead equipment requirements for the company’s proposed Crescent Valley I power plant (25MW) and San Emidio II power plant (10MW).

June 20th 2018
Battery Boom: Wind And Solar Can Generate Half Of Worldwide Electricity By 2050

Coal is to shrink to just 11% of global electricity generation by mid-century, from 38% now, as costs shift heavily in favour of wind, solar and batteries. Wind and solar are set to surge to almost “50 by 50” – 50% of world generation by 2050 due to reductions in cost. “Cheap battery storage means that it becomes increasingly possible to finesse the delivery of electricity from wind and solar so that these technologies can help meet demand even when the wind isn’t blowing and the sun isn’t shining. The result will be renewables eating up more and more of the existing market for coal, gas and nuclear.”

January 10th 2018
US: Doubling Of Wind & Solar Capacity Possible By 2020 as Coal & Nuclear Drop

In the latest issue of its “Energy Infrastructure Update” (with data through November 30, 2017), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) notes that proposed net additions to generating capacity by utility-scale wind and solar could total 115,984 megawatts (MW) by December 2020 – effectively doubling their current installed capacity of 115,520 MW.  The numbers were released as FERC prepares for a January 10 meeting to consider U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s proposal for a bailout of the coal and nuclear industries.