ees 2019
5 September 2018 2018 10:15 AM GMT

Electrification The Key To Decarbonising Europe’s Economy

Electrification is the key to decarbonising Europe’s economy, according to WindEurope CEO Giles Dickson, who was speaking recently at a European Commission event on long-term emissions reductions.

EU leaders asked the Commission earlier this year to update the EU’s 2050 climate strategy. The current version, dating back to before COP21 in Paris, says the EU should cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80% in 2050. A revised version is now expected before COP24 in Katowice.

WindEurope CEO Giles Dickson said: “According to the International Energy Agency, wind will be the number one source of electricity soon after 2030, providing more than 30% of Europe’s electricity. But electricity is only 22% of the final energy needed by Europe’s economy. Political momentum is starting to grow for an EU target of net-zero emissions in 2050 in the new strategy. To do this we’ll need to electrify heating and transport, where the share of renewables is just 18% and 6% respectively. If we’re serious about decarbonisation, changing that has to be the number one priority”.

“We also need to make sure we still have an EU industry that can deliver the equipment needed to make this happen. Over 260,000 people work in wind in Europe. In the face of rising international competition, Europe needs to keep an edge in the production of wind energy components. This requires a robust domestic European market so the industry has enough scale to keep reducing costs. An increased commitment to EU Research and Innovation funding for wind energy, including for onshore wind, will also be critical to Europe’s competitiveness.”

WindEurope has claims to be the voice of the wind industry, actively promoting wind power in Europe and worldwide. It has over 450 members, active in over 40 countries. In addition to wind turbine manufacturers with a leading share of the world wind power market, its membership encompasses component suppliers, research institutes, national wind and renewables associations, developers, contractors, electricity providers, finance and insurance companies, and consultants. Its “Delivering 2050 decarbonisation strategy” highlights the challenges and opportunities of decarbonisation.

March 30th 2019
Battery Boom: Wind And Solar Can Generate Half Of Worldwide Electricity By 2050

Coal is to shrink to just 11% of global electricity generation by mid-century, from 38% now, as costs shift heavily in favour of wind, solar and batteries. Wind and solar are set to surge to almost “50 by 50” – 50% of world generation by 2050 due to reductions in cost. “Cheap battery storage means that it becomes increasingly possible to finesse the delivery of electricity from wind and solar so that these technologies can help meet demand even when the wind isn’t blowing and the sun isn’t shining. The result will be renewables eating up more and more of the existing market for coal, gas and nuclear.”

March 30th 2019
EU Approves Ambitious Energy Efficiency Goals, Encourages Clean Energy Feed-In

Europeans will now be entitled to consume, store and sell the renewable energy they produce in line with ambitious targets set by the EU. The targets are to be reviewed by 2023, and can only be raised, not lowered. By making energy more efficient, Europeans will see their energy bills reduced. In addition, Europe will reduce its reliance on external suppliers of oil and gas, improve local air quality and protect the climate. For the first time, member states will also be obliged to establish specific energy efficiency measures to the benefit of those affected by energy poverty. Member states must also ensure that citizens are entitled to generate renewable energy for their own consumption, to store it and to sell excess production.

March 24th 2019
Clean Energy: Most Competitive Source of New Power Generation in the Middle East

Renewable energy is the most competitive form of power generation in GCC countries, according to a new report published by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). It says that achieving stated 2030 targets brings significant economic benefits to the region including the creation of more than 220 000 new jobs whilst saving over 354 million barrels of oil equivalent (MBOE) in regional power sectors. Furthermore, the power sector’s CO2 emissions can be reduced by 136 million tonnes (22%), while water withdrawals in the power sector can be cut by 11.5 trillion litres (17% reduction) in 2020.

March 29th 2019
Wind: China Maintains Emerging Markets Top Spot Following 19.7GW Build Boom

Wind industry intelligence service A Word About Wind has launched its Emerging Markets Attractiveness Index report for 2018, which provides insight and analysis into the most attractive emerging markets for wind companies. The index, now in its second year, ranks the top 30 emerging markets that investors should consider when investing in wind in Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America. The list considers factors including political and economic stability for investors, alongside the growth of electricity demand and potential for wind growth, in order to rank the countries by overall potential. As with last year’s report, China tops the list and the ongoing trade war with the US shows no sign of slowing China’s formidable growth.

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