21 May 2017 2017 09:15 AM GMT

Russia: Abundance Of Renewables Can Fuel Growth; Quadruple Clean Energy By 2030

Russia can increase the share of renewables in its energy mix from roughly 3 percent today to more than 11 percent by 2030, according to new findings by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The growth in renewable energy use would represent nearly a fourfold increase in the share of renewables between 2014 and 2030. Renewable Energy Prospects for the Russian Federation was presented to high-level stakeholders at a meeting in Moscow, between the Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation and IRENA.

“The global energy transition is underway, with this study we have a better understanding of Russia’s renewable energy potential, what benefits it could bring, and what can be done to make this a reality,” said IRENA Director-General Adnan Z. Amin. “Russia has had a long history of leadership in the energy sector – and now has the opportunity to extend that leadership into renewable energy.”

Russia has significant potential of all renewable energy sources, with large hydropower and bioenergy being the main sources of renewables in the country’s energy system today. By the end of 2015, total installed renewable power generation capacity reached 53.5 gigawatts (GW), representing about 20 percent of the country’s total capacity, the majority of which lies in large hydropower.

“Further developing Russia’s rich and diverse renewable energy resources can significantly contribute to the country’s economic objectives such as economic growth and employment, diversify the energy mix, improve energy security and reduce energy supply costs in remote regions,” Mr Amin added.

Under Russia’s current energy strategy the share of renewable energy will reach 4.9 percent by 2030, falling short of its potential of more than 11.3 percent, by IRENA’s estimates. According to the new working paper, the power sector is estimated to have the highest renewable energy share, at about 30 percent in 2030 — split into 20 percent for hydropower and 10 percent for wind, solar photovoltaic (PV) and geothermal power.

In addition to hydropower and bioenergy, Russia has already taken steps to accelerate deployment of other renewable energy technologies. The country’s current renewable energy policy focuses on accelerating the deployment of wind and solar PV, and in 2016, approximately 70 megawatts of new renewable energy capacity was introduced.

To implement the study’s recommendations, an annual investment of approximately USD 15 billion per year between 2015 and 2050 is required, but IRENA shows that the benefits can exceed costs when externalities related to human health and climate change are considered. Renewables identified under REmap can save up to USD 8 billion per year by 2030, and additional benefits could include potentially exporting wind and hydropower to Asia, and biofuels to Europe — according to current estimates Russia has the largest wind potential in the world.

Renewable Energy Prospects for the Russian Federation is part of IRENA’s renewable energy roadmap programme, REmap, which determines the potential for countries, regions and the world to scale up renewables to ensure an affordable and sustainable energy future. The roadmap focuses not just on renewable power technologies, but also technology options in heating, cooling and transport. The Russian Federation study is the latest in the series of country-level REmap analyses, which includes countries such as China, Germany, Indonesia, Mexico and the United States.

The full report can be downloaded here.

IRENA is mandated to be the global hub for renewable energy cooperation and information exchange by 150 Members (149 States and the European Union). 27 additional countries are in the accession process and actively engaged. IRENA promotes the widespread adoption and sustainable use of all forms of renewable energy, in the pursuit of sustainable development, energy access, energy security and low-carbon economic growth and prosperity.

November 27th 2018
Solar And Wind Provide 100% Of New Generating Capacity Additions In September

US – According to an analysis by the SUN DAY Campaign of data just released by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), solar and wind were the only energy sources adding new capacity to the U.S. electricity generation mix in September. Three “units” of new wind accounted for 363-MW while nine units of solar provided 339-MW.

August 16th 2019
Corporate Sourcing of Renewables Growing, Taking Place in 75 Countries

Companies in 75 countries actively sourced 465 terawatt hours (TWh) of renewable energy in 2017, an amount close to the overall electricity demand of France, according to the report from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). With the continued decline in the costs of renewables, the report suggests, corporate demand will continue to increase as companies seek to reduce electricity bills, hedge against future price spikes and address sustainability concerns.

August 14th 2019
Wind: China Maintains Emerging Markets Top Spot Following 19.7GW Build Boom

Wind industry intelligence service A Word About Wind has launched its Emerging Markets Attractiveness Index report for 2018, which provides insight and analysis into the most attractive emerging markets for wind companies. The index, now in its second year, ranks the top 30 emerging markets that investors should consider when investing in wind in Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America. The list considers factors including political and economic stability for investors, alongside the growth of electricity demand and potential for wind growth, in order to rank the countries by overall potential. As with last year’s report, China tops the list and the ongoing trade war with the US shows no sign of slowing China’s formidable growth.

December 6th 2017
Renewables Provide 17.8% Of Total US Electricity. Solar Now 2.0% And Wind 6.0%

According to the latest issue of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) “Electric Power Monthly” report, U.S. electrical generation from renewable energy sources (i.e., biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar – inc. distributed solar, wind) rose by 14.69% during the first three-quarters of 2017 compared to the same period in 2016. Simultaneously, electrical generation by fossil fuels and nuclear power combined declined by 5.41%. Nuclear power and coal both dropped by 1.5%, natural gas (including “other” gas) was down by 10.7%, and oil (i.e., petroleum liquids and petroleum coke) plunged by 17.1%.

August 12th 2019
EU Approves Ambitious Energy Efficiency Goals, Encourages Clean Energy Feed-In

Europeans will now be entitled to consume, store and sell the renewable energy they produce in line with ambitious targets set by the EU. The targets are to be reviewed by 2023, and can only be raised, not lowered. By making energy more efficient, Europeans will see their energy bills reduced. In addition, Europe will reduce its reliance on external suppliers of oil and gas, improve local air quality and protect the climate. For the first time, member states will also be obliged to establish specific energy efficiency measures to the benefit of those affected by energy poverty. Member states must also ensure that citizens are entitled to generate renewable energy for their own consumption, to store it and to sell excess production.

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